Abdominal Pain
Symptoms, Causes, Treatments, Questions & Related Topics

Almost every person will have some sort of abdominal pain in their lifetime. Most of the time, the underlying cause of abdominal pain isn’t a cause for concern and can easily be treated. A variety of conditions can cause abdominal pain, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), appendicitis, Crohn’s disease, endometriosis, kidney stones, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), food intolerances or allergies, and many others.

Since a variety of illnesses and conditions can cause stomach cramps or pain, before seeking medical attention, it’s important to be able to accurately describe your abdominal pain.

Consider the following questions to better describe your unique abdominal pain:

  • Where in your abdomen is the pain coming from? Is it localized to your lower, middle, or upper abdomen?
  • Is your abdomen pain burning, dull, steady, sharp, gnawing, or intermittent? Think of a few adjectives that could best describe the type of pain you’re feeling.
  • Is your pain worsened by coughing, moving, or eating certain foods?
  • Is your pain relieved by going to the bathroom, changing positions, avoiding certain foods, drinking water, or taking antacids or a type of over-the-counter pain reliever?
  • Are you experiencing any other symptoms along with your abdominal pain, such as fever, diarrhea, vomiting, or constipation?
  • How long have you been experiencing your abdominal pain? Has it gotten worse, been steady, or lessened over time?

At-home remedies for abdominal pain include avoiding foods that are hard to digest, including spicy and fried foods, drinking plenty of water, and taking over-the-counter medicines.

If your pain is severe or not getting better with treatment or after 48 hours, seek medical treatment and book an appointment at a local urgent care center.

Recommended Reading

This story has been updated for the 2021–2022 flu season. Preparing for the flu can help you and your family avoid severe illness and complications from this common and highly contagious respiratory virus. According to the CDC, getting an annual flu shot is an easy, low-cost way to stay safe a...

You’ve probably been hearing a lot about COVID-19 vaccines lately, and it’s easy to be overwhelmed at the prospect of yet another needle in the form of a flu shot. As we roll into the fall season — and annual flu shot messaging kicks into high gear — consider that a flu shot can make a large impa...

Just when you thought you had checked all the boxes in your fight against the COVID-19 virus, flu season has arrived. Flu season generally lasts from October through March each year. Even though you may think you know everything about avoiding pesky viruses by now, you may be doing a few surprisi...