Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
Reasons to Get One, What to Expect, Associated Risks & More

A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) is a blood test that measures several levels in the body. Specifically, it measures a person’s glucose level, kidney and liver function, and electrolyte and fluid balance. All of these have a range of what is considered to be “normal,” so a CMP can help to diagnose or rule out certain conditions based on the results. Sometimes, a comprehensive metabolic panel is ordered as part of a routine physical, and other times it may be done to help monitor an existing condition, like diabetes or high blood pressure. Some patients may be asked to stop eating and drinking for up to 12 hours prior to the test.

How does a CMP able indicate whether a person’s glucose level, kidney and liver function, and electrolyte and fluid balance is “normal”? By testing the specific levels in the blood of the following:

  • Glucose
  • Potassium
  • Sodium
  • Calcium
  • Chloride
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Total protein
  • Total bilirubin
  • Blood urea nitrogen (BUN)
  • Albumin
  • Aspartate aminotransferase (AST)
  • Alanine amino transferase (ALT)
  • Alkaline phosphatase (ALP)

If you’ve been told to get a CMP, you can skip the hassle of trying to get a doctor’s appointment and instead, use Solv to find an appointment at a local urgent care facility. 

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