Hepatitis B
Symptoms, Causes, Treatments, Questions & Related Topics

Mild fever, headache, stomach pain, fatigue, vomiting – at first glance, the symptoms of hepatitis B sound an awful lot like symptoms of the flu. And actually, some people with hepatitis B don’t show any symptoms at all. But, since this virus affects the liver and can be dangerous if left untreated, it’s important to understand the causes and symptoms of Hepatitis B so that you know when to see a doctor for a diagnosis.

Unlike the flu, which can be spread by just coming into contact with someone who has it, you can only get hepatitis B if you are exposed to the blood or body fluids of an infected person.

Some of the ways hepatitis B can spread include:

  • Unprotected sexual contact with an infected person
  • Sharing needles with an infected person
  • Getting a piercing or tattoo with needles that haven’t been sterilized
  • From mother to baby during delivery

The majority of people who get hepatitis B have acute hepatitis B, meaning they catch the virus and are better within a few months. However, some people – particularly babies and children – may develop chronic hepatitis B, which occurs when a person tests positive for the virus for more than six months after their initial diagnosis. Thankfully, people with chronic hepatitis B can take medication to keep the virus from causing more damage to their liver.

If you think you may have come into contact with the hepatitis B virus – or if you are showing symptoms – it’s important to get checked out by a professional. Since only a simple blood test is needed to diagnose hepatitis B, an urgent care is a great place to go.

Recommended Reading

It’s summer vacay time! Finally, you can leave your house, your Zoom calls, and distance learning behind, roll down the windows, and take a deep breath of much-needed freedom. But as much as we'd like to go full wild-abandon on summer 2021 travel, we still need to exercise some degree of COVID-c...

UPDATE: On May 14, 2021, the CDC updated mask guidelines. If you are fully vaccinated, you can result normal activities - both indoor and outdoor - without wearing a mask or social distancing, except where required by local regulations, including business and workplace guidance. Vaccines are h...

Vaccination eligibility is opening up throughout the country! The FDA just approved use of the Pfizer vaccine in children over the age of 12. However, there are more people eligible for a vaccine right now than there are doses. Securing an appointment continues to be a long, difficult process for...