Browse services
your locationFind care near me

Find Urgent Care today

Find and book appointments for:

Navigating Allergic Reactions: What to Expect at Urgent Care and the ER

Key Points

  • Understand the differences between urgent care and the ER for allergic reactions.
  • Mild reactions can be treated at urgent care, while severe reactions require immediate ER attention.
  • First-aid measures for mild reactions and the importance of avoiding triggers.

If you are experiencing an allergic reaction, you may be weighing a choice between going to urgent care or going to the emergency room. While both options can provide medical care, there are important differences to consider.

First, it is helpful to understand the major differences between urgent care and an emergency room. According to the Urgent Care Association, many urgent care clinics are open on weekends and offer extended hours to accommodate patients who need medical attention outside of regular business hours.

Urgent care clinics offer a wide range of medical services. Some of the services you may be able to get at urgent care, according to the Urgent Care Association, include:

  • Treatment for the symptoms of colds, flu, and COVID-19
  • Mild to moderate allergic reactions
  • Closed fractures
  • Muscle sprains or strains
  • Minor lacerations that may need stitches
  • Minor burns
  • STD testing and treatment
  • Treatment for the symptoms of a UTI
  • Mild to moderate infections
  • Lab testing and imaging services
  • Physicals for work, travel, or sports
  • Immunizations

One of the unique benefits of urgent care clinics is that they offer walk-in appointments for most minor to moderate illnesses and injuries. Urgent care clinics also typically have shorter wait times than emergency rooms, according to the Urgent Care Association. Urgent care centers do not treat life threatening emergencies.

Emergency rooms, on the other hand, are equipped to handle more serious medical emergencies. Some of the serious cases that emergency room’s see include:

  • Chest pain
  • Trouble breathing
  • Trauma
  • Severe bleeding
  • Seizures or loss of consciousness

When it comes to allergic reactions, the severity of your symptoms will determine the best course of action. Mild reactions (such as hives or itching) can usually be treated at urgent care, according to the Mayo Clinic. However, if you are experiencing symptoms such as difficulty breathing, swelling of the face or throat, or a rapid heartbeat, the Mayo Clinic recommends that you seek immediate medical attention at the emergency room.

Navigating Allergic Reactions: What to Expect at Urgent Care and the ER

Key Points

  • Understand the differences between urgent care and the ER for allergic reactions.
  • Mild reactions can be treated at urgent care, while severe reactions require immediate ER attention.
  • First-aid measures for mild reactions and the importance of avoiding triggers.

If you are experiencing an allergic reaction, you may be weighing a choice between going to urgent care or going to the emergency room. While both options can provide medical care, there are important differences to consider.

First, it is helpful to understand the major differences between urgent care and an emergency room. According to the Urgent Care Association, many urgent care clinics are open on weekends and offer extended hours to accommodate patients who need medical attention outside of regular business hours.

Urgent care clinics offer a wide range of medical services. Some of the services you may be able to get at urgent care, according to the Urgent Care Association, include:

  • Treatment for the symptoms of colds, flu, and COVID-19
  • Mild to moderate allergic reactions
  • Closed fractures
  • Muscle sprains or strains
  • Minor lacerations that may need stitches
  • Minor burns
  • STD testing and treatment
  • Treatment for the symptoms of a UTI
  • Mild to moderate infections
  • Lab testing and imaging services
  • Physicals for work, travel, or sports
  • Immunizations

One of the unique benefits of urgent care clinics is that they offer walk-in appointments for most minor to moderate illnesses and injuries. Urgent care clinics also typically have shorter wait times than emergency rooms, according to the Urgent Care Association. Urgent care centers do not treat life threatening emergencies.

Emergency rooms, on the other hand, are equipped to handle more serious medical emergencies. Some of the serious cases that emergency room’s see include:

  • Chest pain
  • Trouble breathing
  • Trauma
  • Severe bleeding
  • Seizures or loss of consciousness

When it comes to allergic reactions, the severity of your symptoms will determine the best course of action. Mild reactions (such as hives or itching) can usually be treated at urgent care, according to the Mayo Clinic. However, if you are experiencing symptoms such as difficulty breathing, swelling of the face or throat, or a rapid heartbeat, the Mayo Clinic recommends that you seek immediate medical attention at the emergency room.

Symptoms Of Allergic Reactions

Allergic reactions can range from mild to severe, according to the Mayo Clinic. They can also occur within seconds or minutes of exposure to an allergen. It is important to recognize the symptoms of allergic reactions and seek medical attention promptly if you have symptoms of a severe reaction.

Symptoms Of Mild And Moderate Allergic Reactions

The Mayo Clinic lists the symptoms of mild to moderate allergic reactions as the following:

  • Itchy or watery eyes
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Sneezing
  • Skin rash or hives
  • Swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • Mild to moderate difficulty breathing
  • Abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting

Symptoms Of Severe Allergic Reactions

A severe allergic reaction (also known as anaphylaxis) is a life-threatening emergency that requires immediate medical attention, according to the Mayo Clinic. Symptoms of anaphylaxis may include:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat that makes it difficult to breathe or swallow
  • Rapid or weak pulse
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Chest pain or tightness
  • Loss of consciousness

If you or someone you know is experiencing any of these symptoms, the Mayo Clinic notes that you should call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room immediately.

It is important to note that symptoms of allergic reactions can vary from person to person, according to the Mayo Clinic. Symptoms can even differ from one reaction to another in the same person. Therefore, it is important to get medical attention if you suspect an allergic reaction.

First Aid For Mild And Moderate Allergic Reactions

If you experience mild or moderate allergic reactions, there are some first-aid measures you can take to manage the symptoms before seeking medical help. Here are some of the most effective first-aid measures, as noted by the Mayo Clinic:

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are medications that can help reduce the symptoms of allergic reactions, such as itching, rash, and hives, according to the Cleveland Clinic. The Cleveland Clinic notes that they work by blocking the effects of histamine, a chemical released by the body during an allergic reaction. Some common over-the-counter antihistamines include:

  • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
  • Loratadine (Claritin)
  • Cetirizine (Zyrtec)
  • Fexofenadine (Allegra)

When you take an antihistamine, it is important to make sure you follow the instructions on the label exactly, and not exceed the recommended dose. If you are unsure which antihistamine to take, consult with a healthcare professional.

First Aid For Severe Allergic Reaction (Epinephrine Auto-Injector)

If you have a history of severe allergic reactions, your doctor may have prescribed you an epinephrine auto-injector—also known as an EpiPen. This device contains a dose of epinephrine (a hormone that can quickly reverse the symptoms of anaphylaxis), giving you more time to seek medical attention for your life-threatening allergic reactions.

According to the Mayo Clinic, if you experience symptoms of anaphylaxis (such as difficulty breathing, swelling of the face or throat, or rapid heartbeat), you should use your epinephrine auto-injector immediately and seek emergency medical attention.

Avoiding Triggers

The best way to prevent allergic reactions is to avoid the triggers that cause them, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). For example, if you are allergic to pollen, they recommend that you try to stay indoors during peak pollen season and keep your windows closed. If you are allergic to certain foods, read the labels carefully and ask about ingredients when eating out.

If you are unsure what triggers your allergies, consider keeping a diary of your symptoms and activities to identify patterns. You can also consult with an allergist, a specialist who can perform tests to determine your specific allergens.

Remember that even mild and moderate allergic reactions can still be serious and should not be ignored, according to the AAAAI. If your symptoms do not improve with first aid measures or if you experience severe symptoms, seek medical attention immediately.

When To Go To Urgent Care vs. ER

Urgent care centers and emergency rooms are both medical facilities that offer medical care services to patients with different medical conditions. Urgent care centers are designed to provide medical attention for non-life-threatening conditions that require expedited attention, while ERs are equipped to provide immediate medical attention for life-threatening conditions. Below you’ll find more information on when to go to an urgent care for an allergic reaction, and when to head to the emergency room.

When To Go To Urgent Care For Allergic Reaction

If you are experiencing symptoms of a mild allergic reaction and over-the-counter measures are not providing you with any relief, you should consider going to an urgent care clinic for treatment. Urgent care clinics are equipped to handle mild to moderate allergic reactions—such as rashes, hives, and mild swelling. If you have a history of severe allergic reactions or anaphylaxis, it is important to carry an epinephrine auto-injector with you at all times, according to the AAAAI. For people with a history of severe allergic reactions or anaphylaxis, the Mayo Clinic notes that you should use your epinephrine auto-injector, and go to the ER immediately.

When to go to The ER For an Allergic Reaction

If you are experiencing a severe allergic reaction or anaphylaxis, you should go to the ER immediately. Severe allergic reactions can be life-threatening and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, according to the Mayo Clinic, include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Feeling lightheaded or faint

At the ER, you will receive immediate medical attention, which may include oxygen therapy, intravenous fluids, and medications to manage your symptoms, according to the Mayo Clinic. ERs are equipped to handle severe allergic reactions and anaphylaxis and can provide you with the necessary medical care to ensure your safety.

It is important to note that if you are unsure whether your allergic reaction requires urgent care or ER attention, it is always better to err on the side of caution and go to the ER.

Frequently asked questions

  • What is the difference between an urgent care clinic and an emergency room?

    Urgent care clinics are designed to provide medical attention for non-life-threatening conditions that require expedited attention, while emergency rooms are equipped to provide immediate medical attention for life-threatening conditions.
  • What services do urgent care clinics offer?

    Urgent care clinics offer a wide range of services including treatment for symptoms of colds, flu, and COVID-19, mild to moderate allergic reactions, closed fractures, muscle sprains or strains, minor lacerations that may need stitches, minor burns, STD testing and treatment, treatment for symptoms of a UTI, mild to moderate infections, lab testing and imaging services, physicals for work, travel, or sports, and immunizations.
  • When should I go to an urgent care clinic for an allergic reaction?

    If you are experiencing symptoms of a mild allergic reaction and over-the-counter measures are not providing you with relief, you should consider going to an urgent care clinic for treatment.
  • What are the symptoms of a severe allergic reaction?

    Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction include difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat that makes it difficult to breathe or swallow, rapid or weak pulse, dizziness or fainting, chest pain or tightness, and loss of consciousness.
  • What should I do if I am experiencing a severe allergic reaction?

    If you are experiencing a severe allergic reaction, you should use your epinephrine auto-injector immediately if you have one and seek emergency medical attention.
  • What are some first-aid measures for mild and moderate allergic reactions?

    First-aid measures for mild and moderate allergic reactions include taking antihistamines to help reduce symptoms and avoiding triggers that cause the allergic reactions.
  • What is an epinephrine auto-injector?

    An epinephrine auto-injector, also known as an EpiPen, is a device that contains a dose of epinephrine, a hormone that can quickly reverse the symptoms of anaphylaxis. It is used in case of severe allergic reactions.
  • How can I prevent allergic reactions?

    The best way to prevent allergic reactions is to avoid the triggers that cause them. This may involve staying indoors during peak pollen season, reading food labels carefully, and consulting with an allergist to determine your specific allergens.
Sources

Solv has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We avoid using tertiary references.

Related Health Concerns

Allergies

Antihistamines

Anxiety

Asthma

Bee sting

Bloating

Broken Arm

Burns

COVID-19 Vaccine

Canker Sore

Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

Cuts

Ear Infection

Gonorrhea

Myomectomy

Pneumonia

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

Solv App

Quality healthcare is just a
click away with the Solv App

Book same-day care for you and your family

Find top providers near you
Choose in-person or video visits
Manage visits on-the-go
Get the FREE App

This site uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By using Solv, you accept our use of cookies.