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Think you may have monkeypox? Here’s what to do.


The 2022 monkeypox outbreak in the United States continues to grow. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now reports over 21,800 cases (September 9, 2022 data). It’s the highest case count ever in the United States. To put things in context, the largest U.S. monkeypox outbreak before this year was in 2003, with 47 confirmed cases. Since cases are rising, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) declared monkeypox a national health emergency on August 4, 2022.

The good news is that, according to the CDC, 99% of people infected with the type of monkeypox currently spreading are likely to survive. However, to keep you and your family safe, it’s best to know more about the disease, what steps to take if you think you may have monkeypox, and how to avoid getting infected.

Think you may have monkeypox? Here’s what to do.


The 2022 monkeypox outbreak in the United States continues to grow. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now reports over 21,800 cases (September 9, 2022 data). It’s the highest case count ever in the United States. To put things in context, the largest U.S. monkeypox outbreak before this year was in 2003, with 47 confirmed cases. Since cases are rising, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) declared monkeypox a national health emergency on August 4, 2022.

The good news is that, according to the CDC, 99% of people infected with the type of monkeypox currently spreading are likely to survive. However, to keep you and your family safe, it’s best to know more about the disease, what steps to take if you think you may have monkeypox, and how to avoid getting infected.

According to the CDC

  • Monkeypox first starts with flu-like symptoms. Some infected people develop a rash, bumps, or blisters on their skin
  • If you find a rash, contact a healthcare provider
  • The disease is not new, and people can recover fully within week

What is Monkeypox? Is it new?

Monkeypox is a viral infection caused by the monkeypox virus. It is not new but rare. Until now, the disease has been mostly found in West and Central Africa. While sporadic cases have been reported in the United States before, the numbers were few and far between.

According to Dr. Rob Rohatsch, MD, Chief Medical Officer of Solv, “What’s concerning about the 2022 monkeypox outbreak is that, in the past, all cases reported out of Africa could be easily traced back to travel from West or Central Africa. Unfortunately, not all cases in the 2022 outbreak can be linked to travel. Additionally, symptoms have been slightly different than what has been traditionally observed.”

The American Academy of Dermatology Association (AADA) also agrees. The AADA indicates that, unlike previous monkeypox outbreaks, it is now common for people with monkeypox to report fewer bumps on their skin. They may also not experience flu-like symptoms before developing the rash.

How does monkeypox spread?

While monkeypox is an infectious disease, it is not highly transmissible like COVID-19. However, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates, it is spread by close skin-to-skin contact, including direct contact with the rash, scabs, or fluids from an infected individual. The CDC also notes that monkeypox can be spread by touching fabrics and other material used by someone with monkeypox, and through respiratory droplets.

Monkeypox Symptoms

According to the CDC, monkeypox symptoms start within three weeks (21 days) of exposure.

The first signs of monkeypox are often flu-like and include:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Tiredness
  • Muscle pain or backache
  • Headache
  • Sore throat, congestion, or cough

According to the College of Urgent Care Medicine (CUCM), a rash will develop after 1-3 days, commonly on the face, which will then spread to the entire body. Lesions typically develop simultaneously and are contagious until scabs have fallen off.

If you suspect you may have monkeypox, you may reach out to an urgent care center for further testing. Solv can help you find an urgent care center near you, fast.

What does the monkeypox rash look like?

At first, monkeypox rashes can look like pimples or blisters and may be painful or itchy, according to the CDC. As the disease progresses, these bumps can be filled with pus or look like blisters or open sores.

Dr. Rohatsch adds, “Monkeypox rashes can look like other infections like herpes, syphilis, chickenpox, or smallpox. Don’t rule out a diagnosis at home. The CDC advises you to reach out to a healthcare provider if you notice bumps or rashes anywhere on your body.”

How long do monkeypox symptoms last?

According to the CDC, monkeypox symptoms can last anywhere from two to four weeks after they first appear. The CDC also notes that someone infected with monkeypox can be contagious during this time — from when symptoms first begin, to when their rash disappears and skin heals.

Says Christopher Chao, MD, president of CUCM, “Be aware that scabs contain active viral particles, and a patient is contagious until new skin has formed.”

What should you do if you think you might have monkeypox?

While it is natural to worry, there is no need to panic. According to the CDC, most people with monkeypox typically fully recover within 2 to 4 weeks without the need for medical treatment.

However, some individuals are at a higher risk of getting more severely ill. The CDC states that people with compromised immune systems, children under 8, individuals with a history of eczema, and people who are pregnant or breastfeeding are at a higher risk.

Dr. Rob Rohatsch, elaborates, “For the majority of infected individuals, symptoms will go away over time. Connect with a healthcare professional or your local urgent care center to discuss any concerns.”

If you have a monkeypox rash (or suspect you do), avoid skin-to-skin contact with other people, pets, and animals, as the CDC advises.

How can you get tested for monkeypox?

If you think you or a loved one may have monkeypox, CDC guidelines recommend you talk to a healthcare provider or visit an urgent care center to make sure. Depending on your symptoms, your provider may suggest an in-person visit and tests if needed. Since monkeypox is contagious, if you’re planning an in-person consultation, please call ahead to let the physician’s office know.

As of August 23, 2022, the CDC advises testing for monkeypox only if you have a rash similar to that of a monkeypox rash.

There is no home test for monkeypox. Currently, tests are available only through a healthcare provider.

Your provider will take swabs from your rashes and send them to a lab for analysis. Results may take a couple of days. During your wait, the CDC recommends taking the necessary precautions and isolating, avoiding skin-to-skin contact with other individuals, and washing your hands often. Because other illnesses can have similar presentations, your provider may order additional tests.

What happens if you test positive for monkeypox?

It can be very stressful to test positive for monkeypox. But, please do remember, as the CDC notes, most people with monkeypox recover fully in 2-4 weeks without medical treatment. If you are at a higher risk of severe illness and require treatment, antivirals like tecovirimat (TPOXX) may be effective at reducing risk of severe illness. According to Dr. Chao, ,many patients will not need anti-viral treatment.

Since monkeypox is infectious, the CDC recommends that you let your close contacts know that they may have been exposed. This way, they can isolate, watch for symptoms, and get timely help if required.

Recovering from monkeypox at home? What precautions should you take?

If you have monkeypox, you can transmit the disease till your symptoms last and until the scabs from your rash have healed. According to the CDC, all bedding, clothing, and materials that come in contact with an infected individual’s rashes, body fluids, or respiratory droplets can be contaminated. Poxviruses like monkeypox can survive in dark, cool, and areas with low humidity.

To prevent the spread of the disease, if you are isolating at home, the CDC advises disinfecting your space, including common areas. After disinfecting, the CDC recommends cleaning your hands using an alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) with 60% alcohol. If you share your home with others, isolate and disinfect any shared material.

When will the monkeypox outbreak end?

It may be too soon to tell. The 2022 monkeypox outbreak is still ongoing but there may be hope on the horizon. On August 25, 2022, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported a 21% decline in monkeypox cases. According to WHO’s Director-General, the outbreak may be slowing down in Europe.

However, as reported by Reuters, the United States is seeing an increase in cases, with over 34% of the global cases now in the U.S. While we may hope for lower case counts at home, for now, the mantra continues to be, “when in doubt, get it checked out.” If you find a rash on your body, the CDC recommends talking to a healthcare provider. 



Disclaimer:
The content provided here and elsewhere on the Solv Health site or mobile app is provided for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as, and Solv Health, Inc. does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always contact your healthcare provider directly with any questions you may have regarding your health or specific medical advice.

The views expressed by authors and contributors of such content are not endorsed or approved by Solv Health and are intended for informational purposes only. The content is reviewed by Solv Health only to confirm educational value and reader interest. You are encouraged to discuss any questions that you may have about your health with your healthcare provider.

Sources

Solv has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We avoid using tertiary references.

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