Foot Injury
Symptoms, Causes, Questions & Related Topics

Although you may not think about your feet much, they can be considered evolutionary marvels of the human body. The foot is an incredibly intricate structure that is comprised of 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 tendons, muscles, and ligaments! Because they bear your body weight every day, it’s no wonder that the feet are particularly prone to injuries, which can occur anywhere from the toes to the Achilles heel.

There are many ways that toe, foot, or ankle injuries can occur. In children, most of these injuries happen during sports, play, or falls. The risk is particularly high during activities that require a lot of jumping, such as basketball, and pivoting, such as football or soccer. The same risk applies for certain athletes, such as dancers, gymnasts, or basketball and soccer players. You don’t always need to be really physically active to get a foot injury, however. Older adults are at a higher risk for foot injuries and fractures because they lose muscle mass and bone strength, along with vision and coordination.

Whether from wear-and-tear, overuse, or sports-related activities, the most common injuries that occur in the feet include:

  • Injuries to joints (sprains)
  • Pulled muscles (strains)
  • A bone moving out of place (dislocation)
  • Injuries to tendons, such as ruptured tendons in your heel (Achilles tendon)
  • Broken bones, such as broken toes
  • Inflammation of connecting tissue that runs across the bottom of the foot (Plantar fasciitis)
  • Puncture wounds from stepping on sharp objects

Although a foot injury can be especially painful and inconvenient, the good news is that many minor foot injuries can be treated at home with pain relievers, stretching exercises, and RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). If your injury does not heal with at-home treatment, or you want to speed up the recovery process, use Solv to help you find an urgent care clinic near you. Our app will give you a list of all of the facilities in your location and allow you to schedule an appointment to be treated the same day, so you to get on the road to recovery and back to the activities you enjoy the most sooner, rather than later.

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